Interview - Junky Projects - INVURT

Sunshines Top 10 Melbourne Street Art & Graffiti – July 2017

Another month rolls by, and I dont know about you but the cold weather lately has been really making me wish for summer to come as soon as it can! The cold doesnt stop the painting though, and this time around Dean Sunshine has ten great shots of some of the cool shit that has been sprayed and smashed up on the walls of Melbourne this month! Check them all out below, and enjoy!! 1. ELK – stkilda 2. SAGE – Brunswick 3. FACTER – Windsor 4. KID SILK + PUTOS Hosier Lane 5. CELOUT – CBD, Melbourne 6. RONE

Sunshines Melbourne Graffiti & Street Art Top 10 – June 2017

Again and again, every month Mr Dean Sunshine brings us all the cool shit that has happened on the walls of our fair city. This month brings a whole slew of cool stuff, from Makatron to Dosey, Scale and Porn and everything else thats grand in this lineup of works! Check them all out below, we’ll have more for you next month, of course! 1. Julian Clavijo – Brunswick 2. Makatron – South Yarra 3. Deams – Clifton Hill 4. Senekt – Clifton Hill 5. Porn – Fitzroy  6. Al Stark – Melbourne 7. Dosey + Sugar – Sunshine lane,

Snapshots – OBEY – Shepard Fairey – Vivid – Sydney

Our man Dean Sunshine was up in Sydney last week to cehck out Vivid Sydney – specifically, he was taking a bit of time checking out the Shepherd Fairey exhibition, Printed Matters, and mural that he was painting as a part of the event. This was a bit of the blurb from the show: “Iconic American artist Shepard Fairey blurs the boundaries of art and design. His unique style is instantly recognised in exhibitions and walls around the world. His body of work includes the OBEY GIANT art project, the Barak Obama HOPE campaign, and this year’s ubiquitous ‘We The

Sunshines Top 10 Melbourne Street Art & Graffiti – May 2017

Winter is here, but that has not stopped the paint from going up on the walls. Braving the chilling conditions, our intrepid Dean Sunshine has, once again, sought out all his favourite pieces that have been painted on the streets of Melbourne! Theres a mighty fine selection this month, so check them all out below! 1. ELLE – St.Kilda 2. HA HA – Brunswick 3. LOV3 – Collingwood  4. Resio – Clifton Hill 5. Be Free – Northcote  6. Crisp – Hosier Lane, Melbourne  7. Heesco – Windsor 8. Steve Cross – Melbourne  9. JME NACK SICK BAFLE – Clifton Hill 10.

VR Snapshots – Immersive Media Lounge – State Library of Victoria

A few weeks ago Invurt was involved in creating the Immersive Media Lounge at Melbourne Knowledge Week 2017, hosted at the State Library of Victoria. The event was an awesome success with hundreds of people coming through the doors across the week, and some very cool artwork being created. I was pretty impressed with what the artists came up with (Senekt, Facter, Conrad Bizjak and RASHEE).  Invurt and Phoria had the HTC Vive rocking Google Tilt Brush against a Green screen – Hollywood Styles, resulting in  a mixed reality display combining what the artist was doing against the world they

Video – Wall To Wall Festival 2017 – Benalla

Another Wall To Wall has been and gone, but they’re got the video out, and it looks totally rad! “The Wall to Wall Festival is the largest regional street art festival in Australia. And also one of the most innovative community development initiatives on a national level. This year it hosted 35 internationally acclaimed artists from Australia and around the world, and attracted thousands of curious participants and observers from near and far. It’s changing the face of Benalla, one wall at a time. And changing a whole community’s identity, while it’s at it. ” Man, it’d be great to

Sunshines Top 10 Melbourne Street Art and Graffiti – April 2017

Okay, here we go yet again (and again, can you believe this is No. 73? Jeezus) with Dean Sunshines picks for all the cool shit he saw around our city this month, and its a pretty nice colleciton indeed with everything from Lush and Dvate, to Love and relative newcomer Welin (who keeps getting up all over the place).   Check out all the rad images below if you know whats grand!     1. Lucy Lucy – Preston 2. Frosk, Facter, Keomatch, – Richmond  3. Ling – Preston 4. Lush – Brunswick 5. Awes – Melbourne  6. Arcy –

Sunshines Top 10 Melbourne Street Art & Graffiiti – March 2017

Well, we’re really late on this one, and my apologies for that, its been a busy month! Once again, we have Dean Sunshine providing us with monthly pick of all the great and grand work that has gone up around the walls of Melbourne, and this month is no exception. Always nice to see familiar names, but even better ot see some newer ones that have started to pop up – we’re especially loving the work of Julian Clavijio and Welin in recent months. Check it all out below! 1. Shida – Sunshine Lane, Brunswick 2. Stormie Mills – Prahran

Through The Lens March 2017 – David Russell Photography

March has passed by leaving some pretty fresh art on the streets of Melbourne once again, the standout for me would definitely be the work of Rone in the now demolished Fairfield paper mills. The big Sinch tag rates as one of my favourites as well go big or go home as they say, also see some new works by Heesco, Choq,  Jason Parkers lovely portrait of Juddy Roller artist Goodie at Off The Kerb Gallery. Stay tuned for next month as Im going to the Benalla Street art festival over three days, this looks to be the biggest one

Snapshots – The Light In Us – Isolde – Off The Kerb Gallery

Congratulations to Isolde on her first solo exhibition at the iconic Off The Kerb gallery in Collingwood, run by the ever busy and beautiful Shini. I would have to say the work of Isolde would definitely be some of my favourite paste ups I have seen on the streets of Melbourne, in her many art covered lanes. Isolde’s work always stood out, her powerful images amongst the rust and ruin of some grungy laneway, this is where her work shines. For those that couldn’t make it down to Off The Kerb, I managed to garb some photos while having my

Interview – Junky Projects

This post appeared on Vandalog.com yesterday. Big thanks to Vandalog for allowing us to share this interview with you!

Junky Project. Photo by KayVee.INC.

Junky Project. Photo by KayVee.INC.

 

Daniel Lynch aka Junky Projects is and has always been one of my favourite Melbourne street artists. The reason is simple, because he’s different. Junky’s creations are a breath of fresh air in Melbourne’s street art scene. With his red hair and awesome taste in fashion, Junky is also one of the most interesting characters in the scene.

Junky describes his work on his website: “Essentially I create sentinels from junk and install them in strategic positions around the place to help remind passers by that if they continue to create so much waste in their lives one day it may come back to haunt them.” I find this idea fascinating and I love finding new characters around the city staring down at me from lamp posts and walls. He also makes amazing sculptures much greater in size than his street work.


Junky has a show coming up on the 21st of March at Dark Horse Experiment called Wasted. I’m looking forward to seeing what he creates for the show. You can see more of his work via this Flickr pool.

I recently caught up with Daniel and this is what we talked about…

LM: Where did your name come from?

JP: I had been toying around with the junk medium for a little while and using old tags that I had been using previously for straight up bombing, but it didn’t seem right. At the time there were a lot of artists popping up with really unusual names, and I dug that straight away. The old kinda more traditional tags were sorta flashy and 80’s sounding. When I heard tags like ‘RotGut’ Or ‘Snotrag’ I thought these were the kinda tags that stood out for me and sounded different. Because I was using recycled waste materials in my work I decided ‘Junky’ sounded like a nice brutal tag and straight away it stuck. But that was when it was all more anonymous. There is a certain luxury in the anonymity which means you can call yourself whatever you want. But then some dickhead Melbourne “Art Critic” took it upon himself to announce on the internet my real name and tag, so I had the problem of people coming up to me at shows calling me Junky, which can be awkward in certain situations. So I added the ‘projects’ part to kind of try and separate the person from the work a little, So that I am Daniel Lynch and these are my ‘Junkyprojects’.

Junky Projects - Photo by AllThoseShapes

Junky Projects. Photo by AllThoseShapes.

 

LM: Where did the idea for your characters come from? How did you come up with the idea?

JP: Coming to Melbourne from a smaller town like Newcastle can be a pretty intimidating experience. I had been making art, working a bit of graphic design and getting really involved in the graff scene for some time and of course Melbourne is the place to be if your into that stuff, so down I came. But once your here there are so many big personalities and crazy painters doing their thing everywhere, and doing it well. I just felt like my old approach to getting up was pretty much just that, old. I had seen some work by some guys around the world installing plaque’s and mosaics, even ‘Fuckin Revs’ steel welded sculptures, and I decided to have a crack at something like that. The junk aspect came naturally. I’ve always collected weird crap that I find, this just gave me an outlet for it. Once I put a few up they were really well received so I kept at it. Now its just a snowball I can’t stop.

Junky Projects - Photo by AllThoseShapes

Junky Projects. Photo by AllThoseShapes.

 

LM: How long have you been doing what you do? How did you start? Have you always been into art?

JP: I grew up loving art. Art galleries were always amazing beautiful special places for me as a young person. Somewhere to go think and reflect. Very early on I decided that I wanted to be an Artist, but as it goes everybody around me told me that it was a silly pursuit for Bleeding hearts and hopeless romantics, fraught with poverty and woe. Of course I paid no mind and went ahead with it anyway. I did a Visual Communications Degree at Newcastle uni and came out a qualified Graphic designer, but I hated the idea that it was now my job to help the advertisers of the world sell crap to the public that they shouldn’t buy and don’t need anyway. So I decided to use my powers for good instead of evil. I’ve been working as Junkyprojects now for about eight years.

Junky Projects - Photo by AllThoseShapes

Junky Projects. Photo by AllThoseShapes.

 

LM: Are there certain materials you like to use the most?

JP: I love the look of old rusty steel. For my street work that’s the best. I also love using old timbers because they have such a rich history. A block of wood was once a tree, then maybe a carport, then maybe get thrown around for a dog to chase, then washed out to sea, makes its way back onto shore and into one of my sculptures, I like those possibilities. Theses days though im really enjoying building sculptures with polystyrene packaging. Its such a disgusting oil based waste product which is available in such abundance if you just look. But it’s also really light and quite strong, and I love the shapes that are inherent in the forms already when I find the materials.

Junky Projects - Photo by AllThoseShapes

Junky Projects. Photo by AllThoseShapes.

 

LM: What do you always carry with you on the street?

JP: Hammer, Extra Nails, Stickers, Sunglasses.

LM: Tell us a little about the process. Do you make these characters at home or in the studio and then attach them to things? Or do you make them on the fly?

JP: Usually I make them at the studio, I’ll collect up all the crap I need and the assemble a heap all at once then go out and install them, easy. Sometimes if I’m out somewhere having fun installing work and I run out of pre made pieces, I might make some there on the spot with whatever I can get my hands on. That’s where the spare nails come in.

LM: Aside from your street work, tell us a little about your larger sculptures? Where can we see some of these?

JP: The larger sculptures are just a natural flow of the work I guess. The street pieces are just quick tags for me so I like to put some more time and effort into larger work sometimes. And sometimes I install the larger stuff out and about. There are still a few around Brunswick I think, but because of the ephemeral nature of art out in the streets and because I’m kinda making it all up as I go along, a lot of the bigger stuff has disappeared. But keep your eyes peeled for more to pop up soon. Also the best place to see my larger sculptural work is at my exhibition on Friday.

Junky Projects - Photo by AllThoseShapes

Junky Projects. Photo by AllThoseShapes.

 

LM: Do you dabble in any other forms of art? Like aerosol for example?

JP: I’ve always painted aerosol. I love the freedom and the social aspect of painting with a group of mates. It’s good to keep those skills and stay up. And Graffiti will never die.

LM: Apart from your art work, how else do you contribute to Melbourne’s street art culture?

JP: Well I’m a tour guide for starters, so I take tourists and school students around to check out all the amazing art in our alleys and laneways, that keeps me busy. I also do a lot of workshops with young people and disadvantaged youth. Those are great. We really get to engage a wide cross section of kids who are all facing different issues. Art can be a great outlet for these kids and being able to do something creative often really makes a difference to their lives.

Junky Projects - Photo by AllThoseShapes

Junky Projects. Photo by AllThoseShapes.

 

LM: Tell us about “Wasted” your latest exhibition at Dark Horse Experiment? What can we expect from the show?

JP: Wasted is a collection of sculptures, collage, assemblage and installation which for me are all to some extent about magic and myth. All these materials have a life force and a spirit and when we turn materials into waste that spirit is broken down . When I create artworks from these wasted materials it feels like I am creating a new life force and a new spirit for that object. The work I have created seeks to harness this mythology and manifest it into real objects.

LM: What else is coming up for Junky Projects in 2014 and beyond?

JP: Who knows. I’d really like to get out and do some serious traveling over the next few years, maybe some artist residencies here there and everywhere. I’m also really interested in going out into regional areas and partnering with some of these communities to create public artworks made from local waste products. Basically I just wanna get out there and make much more art in many wide and diverse places. Have hammer, Will travel.

Junky Projects - Photo by AllThoseShapes

Junky Projects. Photo by AllThoseShapes.

Photos courtesy of Junky Projects, AllThoseShapes and KayVee.INC

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