Interview - E.L.K. - Not With It - INVURT
Rone - Empty

Rone – Empty – Scann3D/VR

After seeing one of the most amazing shows of all time, Rone’s Empty, and knowing the space would soon disappear – I had to introduce Rone to some good friends of mine, the crew at Scann3D.  Using their super high end 360 scanning technology – we spent about 5 hours in the space after the show closed one night scanning the entire show – and after many hours of intense rendering the guys at Scann3D have created this 360 capture of the show.  This technology is like google maps on steroids and is a unique and powerful format to capture

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Sunshines Melbourne Street Art & Graffiti Top 10 – October 2016

Its November already, and I’m finally back in Melbourne – and what better way to kick-start things back after my travels than to (belatedly) throw up another fine ass collection of all the best bits of Melbourne street art and graffiti that Dean Sunshine saw over the past month!  These top 10s never disappoint, and there’s always a great cross section of work amongst his monthly picks – so check it all out below!  1. MERDA – Melbourne  2. Bailer – St.Kilda 3. Slicer – Brunswick 4. Makatron + Conrad Bizjak – Melbourne  5. Ethicks – Brunswick 6. Hayden Dewar

Through The Lens October 2016 – David Russell Photography

Join me once again as its that time to see what I saw in the month of October, it was a big month for artist Rone with his exhibition “EMPTY“, man what a show this was exhibited in the old Lyric theatre for the last time before demolition. October also saw “The Art Of Banksy“, exhibition behind Federation square along the train tracks, there was so much controversy surrounding this show. I wasn’t too phased I was just happy to be there with handful of my good mates who’s art featured on the way in to the exhibition, its on

Snapshots – EMPTY – RONE – Lyric Theatre

This show will be talked about long after the metal monsters tear down this beautiful 1920’s theatre that Rone brought back to life, giving Melbourne one last chance to see her in all her beauty. And boy did she shine especially from a photographers point of view, I returned 3 times to capture the amazing space come to life with these incredible shards of light coming through the porthole windows from 3:30 pm. I also loved just watching all the reactions of the bystanders as they walked in and were struck by a 10 metre mural depicting a female over

Snapshots – The Art Of Banksy – The Paddock Federation Square

This is one show that had its fair share of critics “The Art Of Banksy” featuring art purchased by various collectors on display in a faux London street scape. I myself am a big fan as are many are of Banksy’s work as it is what street art was originally about and that is using the street to convey a message about war, hunger, greed, politicians and the list goes on. It was great to see the works up close but something just didn’t feel right, some of the works felt out of place on a clean sterile wall, as

Snapshots – IN THE SHADOWS OF MANKIND – GEORGIE SECCULL – Gas Works Art Space

Once again congratulations to Georgie Seccull on her first solo show at the Gasworks arts space in Albert park, when I attended the show last week I was impressed to say the least. On seeing her creations up close one got to appreciate the amount of work that went into each piece she had created. Made from wood, metal, wire and other everyday objects, I could see Georgie had employed many techniques to bring these amazing pieces of art to life. For those that couldn’t make it to her show enjoy the photos I took while I was at the

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Sunshines Melbourne Street Art & Graffiti Top 10 – September 2016

Melbourne street art and graffiti are still going so damn strong, but would have thought we’d be three quarters of the way through 2016 already? And that so much amazing work has already gone up on the walls of our city? Dean Sunshine found us his top ten picks once again for this busy month, and as we come out of winter and into spring, I cant help but be pretty excited to see what else 2016 has in store for us!! Check out all the latest pics below, and enjoy! 1. Sirum – Clifton Hill 2. Lush – Cremorne

Through The Lens September 2016 – David Russell Photography

The month of September saw me capture everything from exhibitions featuring Shida at the new Backwoods space over in Footscray, Ha Ha at Off The Kerb Gallery and Frenchy at Backwoods Gallery, I also managed to spend a bit of time in the heart of Melbourne in Bourke Street with one of my favourite artists Mayonaize. As per usual I have a bunch of night time long exposure shots doing a bit of light painting, this has to be some of my favourite work as I have said many times in my previous posts, the art comes alive under torch

Snapshots – Brainfade – Frenchy – Backwoods Gallery

Almost forgot to post these photos from the exhibition Brainfade by the artist Frenchy at Backwoods Gallery a few weeks back, so for those were unable to attend the show enjoy the photos I captured.  

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Interview – Ox King

Distinctive, colorful, weird and downright gorgeous are all words that I’d attribute to the work of Ox King – and even then, they are meager words and are not able to give full justice to the pieces he does. Having worked across the years honing his style, which crosses between pop and fantastical fauna, to the realms of saturated manga-come-blade-runner-esque feminine visuals, Ox King has quickly become one of the most recognisable artists painting walls across Australia. Working predominantly around the streets of Sydney, Ox has also traveled wide and far, spreading his work across a legion of walls and into

Interview – E.L.K. – Not With It

 

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I can pinpoint where I met E.L.K. to the exact moment, and I can remember quite clearly, exactly, what was said and what happened. In fact, I wrote about it, so even if my memory had of, by chance, been a little hazy its all there.

It was, truth be told, something of a “moment” for me. On the one hand, that moment was the beginning of an entirely unexpected friendship with a man whose friendship I both respect and treasure, and on the other it was one of those moments that a writer looks back on and goes “I was there!” with some amount of pride (intermingled with a slight fraction of awe) – because, sitting here a year and a half later, at that time I had very little idea of where E.L.K. would be with today.

Neither, of course, did he.

Some of his words to me, back in the park where we first met, echoed in my mind as we sat down at The Vic last week, drinks in hand.

“If you can make a living, successfully,” doing what you love doing and doing what you’re good at,” he remarked “ … it’s the dream!”

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In the past year and a half, a part of this dream has, in truth, come true for E.L.K. His love for art, his passion and dedication over the years have paid off in many ways, and he now spends his “working hours” creating his art – but even being granted a partial aspect of his artistic dream hasn’t come without its own trials.

“I thought it would take a lot longer to get where I am,” he remarks, humbly as always, when I catch up with him. “I thought, ten years maybe, realistically. But it really has been a big couple of years.”

“I do feel tired,” he laughs. “Not I need a nap tired – I’m fucking drained!”

The fact that he can laugh about it all, however, marks that he has also taken it in his stride – because it really has been a big fucking year for E.L.K.

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After moving to Melbourne from Canberra, it seemed as if it was all systems go right from the very start. Although now residing in Richmond at Paradise Hills, E.L.K. did a short stint at Blender studios, where he immediately got to work on a new portrait piece of the much loved and notable Fr Bob Maguire.

When he first submitted Fr Bobs portrait to the Archibald prize, E.L.K. was less than certain as to how it would be received, this was, after all, one of the biggest contemporary art prizes in Australia. That it was selected to take part in the actual competition itself was not only a major win for street derived art in general, but it was a phenomenal boost for the career of an artist who had literally worked his ass off – it was another win for the acknowledgement that street derived art has a place in Australian contemporary art, and E.L.K. was at the forefront of it all.

“Its been a really big wave – a huge wave,” he explains when we start talking about his reflects on the Archibald “experience”.

“Not so much the Archibald itself, but the buzz surrounding it, the media surrounding it. Nothing prepares you for it. It’s what we all want – but when it actually happens, fuck, you can’t go back from it. Actually ‘making it’ can be pretty scary – but once you face it … well, not so much. ”

Beyond the media, the promotion and the entire “mainstream” rigmarole behind the Archibald, being a part of the whole process and event also gave E.L.K. something that he believed he was missing, something worth more in his mind than all the rest.

“It gave me more confidence,” he confided. “Which really was something I was lacking, within myself and with my art.” He sits back and takes a drink before putting on a wry grin, “Yeah, it was definitely an awesome ride.

“I felt like I was almost tapping into the zeitgeist,” he continued, talking about the entire experience. “The subject, the timing an the award, and it was just the right time. I think the Art Gallery of NSW was looking to introduce street art into the award, but they just hadn’t quite had the right piece. So, the planets aligned and it just … I felt like there was something a lot more spiritual going on behind the scenes, which is funny, coming from an atheist, but there was more to it I felt.”

E.L.K.s Archibald piece none withstanding, as a hardcore atheist, there was more than one “spiritual connection” that came from the experience – the other being the formation of a friendship with his subject.

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“I’ve become quite close with Fr Bob,” he says, smiling. “He’s a great guy. I’m like a 33 year old, and he’s much older … but we’re quite the same – kindred souls. He just says it how it is, and that’s something I’ve always done, and said. I may not always be right, but that’s my perception. With Fr Bob there’s no bullshit, and I respect that. It’s just nice to come across. Particularly in regards to the art world, you come across a lot of bullshit, so it’s nice to have a bit of truth.”

“We do talk quite regularly. I had a call from him last week and he said ‘what’s this about my face popping up all over town” he laughs, obviously making mention of the many Fr Bob stickers that have surreptitiously been springing up around Melbourne of late “… I kinda said, well, I can have a chat to them if you want, and I can see if they’ll stop doing it!”

Not only did E.L.K. form a bond with Fr Bob over the work, but it also lead him in a new direction with his work. Whereby previously, his work focused heavily on the portrayal of issues and other societal concerns, he found himself recently changing direction towards a more classically orientated bent – portraiture.

“I’ve actually concentrated a lot more on portraiture and less on the street sort of social commentary work that I’ve done,” he explained. “I think id like to establish myself more as a portrait artist than a stencil artist, to be honest.”

“The whole process of selecting a subject, meeting the subject and making the art and capturing that subject is great. Also, for me, and mainly, just the whole unveiling of the piece to the subject can be really touching.”

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As a man who has for time now been acknowledged as a master of his chosen technique, with stencils comprising up to seventy different layers of high degrees of detail, as well as an individual who has tackled subjects including war, religion, consumption and greed, it is this human touch to his new works in portraiture that have him flowing with exuberance.

“I don’t know what it is about it – its all, imagery creation,” he says, laconically, “but it really has nothing to do with technique anymore. It’s all about subject and content. I have the technique down pat – but getting the right image, and making it all work, that’s the hard part.”

Thus, his upcoming solo show at Metro Gallery, “Not With It”, is something of an explorative body of work for E.L.K.. Of course, within the show are several of his older themed pieces of social commentary, older themed work, but the body of the show, and the epic mainstay for a certainty, is in the portraiture that he will be displaying. Having been through a portion of the maelstrom of “success” and not gone down with the ship in the process, it seems that this has had nothing but a positive effect.

“It was really about pushing myself, in many ways,” he explains, “and to not worry about it too much. Just man-ing up and getting into it – which is what I did – but it wasn’t easy.”

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In fact, when we caught up at Paradise Hills that night, before our sojourn down to the pub on Victoria Street, E.L.K. had only just finished a portrait of aboriginal actor Jack Charles. The work is massive, one of the largest and most intricate pieces that I have ever seen him produce. The shades and tones of the work left me breathless, and as he pulls up a photo of it I can’t help but think that for all the “success” that he has had thus far, that this is only the beginning.

“It took me three weeks to do that piece,” he says, almost belying the effort behind it. “It was all about pushing things further … I can’t do what I used to do. I can’t sit down and cut for a hundred hours … it’s really good, but I’m tired.”

“It’s a really good kind of tired, though.”

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