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Exhibition – Seasons of Change 19 – Autumn – ACM (Art Crush Mob) – Revolver

One of Invurt’s all time favourite ongoing exhibition series is back once again for Autumn 2016, this time with the Arts Crush Mob, aka ACM. The show will feature works by Bailer, Dynes, Hatch, Kid Silk, Nekm, Putos, Rews & Siege.  From the event page: “SOC is such a rad exhibition, showcasing some of Melbourne’s greatest artists and crews. I love the fact that this exhibition showcases some of Melbourne’s best artists and also gives people an opportunity to buy work from artists that sometimes do not show in galleries so often, giving people a chance to own something unique. SOC also shows an ongoing commitment

Exhibition – “Kioku – Flashback Memeories” By Goma – Backwoods Gallery

This looks to be a great show, Im looking forward to this one see you guys at Backwoods Gallery.   In his youth, the Tokyo born Goma traveled to the Northern Territory in order to study the didgeridoo under master Djalu Gurruwiwii. During his stay, Goma lived with the Yolngu people and was adopted into the Galpu clan. Under the tutelage of Djalu, Goma became the first non-indigenous person to win the Northern Land Council prize at the Barunga didgeridoo competition. Upon returning to Tokyo, Goma founded the Jungle Rhythm Section, a highly respected musical outfit which blends Jungle and

Exhibition – We Need A Myth – Erin Greer – Off The Kerb Gallery

Get along this Friday night to another art filled night at Off The Kerb Gallery, brought by the amazing Shini, this is one amazing person doing great things for Local and interstate artists for the past 9 years. Get down and support Erin Greer with her show called “We Need A Myth”, also check out the other artists showing in the other rooms. Fables instruct, myths ignite the imagination and dreams form the template of our ever shifting reality. The stories we tell teach us to interpret our world. They can, quite literally, shape the world around us. There is

Through The Lens – January 2016 – David Russell Photography

Welcome back to my series of photos capturing Melbourne’s amazing Graffiti and Street art culture, documenting artists, walls, galleries and everything in between. I’m really looking forward to what this year brings, so join me for another year of Through The Lens and see what Melburn Has to offer the world. Till next month where I will bring you a fresh batch of dope walls.

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Sunshines Top 10 – January 2016

Well, the new year is in full swing and 2016 holds a whole bunch of cool shit to come – we’re working on a new project here for the website, which will be released sometime in February, so stay tuned! In the meantime, here is Dean Sunshines monthly Top 10 of all the cool shit hes seen of Melbourne street art and graffiti – check it all out below and enjoy! 1. Findac – Brighton 2. Putos – Fitzroy 3. Kaffeine – Fitzroy 4. Shem – Melbourne 5. Damien Mitchell – Brunswick 6. Jimmy C – Collingwood 7. Skream – Fitzroy

Snapshots – Abyss 607 – Guardians Of The Threshold – Off The Kerb Gallery

For those of you who live Northside will be familiar with Abyss 607 and his work, with his unmistakable style adorning Melbourne’s walls, doors , footpaths and even trackside, his work is everywhere. If I can use one word to sum up his show it would be “WOW”, I was super impressed and surprised to say the least, well done Abyss 607, the exhibition space had a serious case of the measles, virtually every piece had a red sold sticker on it. For those of you who could not make it, here are a bunch of pics I took.

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Exhibition – Observance – Ryan Boserio – Melbourne

This is a show I’ve been waiting to see for a damn long time. Since moving to Melbourne from Perth a couple of years ago, Ryan Boserio has constantly worked on progressing his fantastical, surrealistic scifi infused imagery. Over this time his pieces that have popped up in both solo shows in Perth as well as group shows here in Melbourne (with the odd wall popping up here and there), all of which have hinted at a body of work that looks to have been realised with Observance – and damn, I’m fkn excited to see it all. Read on

Exhibition – Guardians Of The Threshold – Abyss 607 – Off The Kerb Gallery

Guardians Of The Threshold Abyss 607 Guardians of the Threshold is a glance into the mythological realms of Abyss 607. The Guardians, also known as the Seers are the deities that look over these dimensions and the ones that conceal the secrets within. The show primarily focuses on the di- vinely archaic forms of the Seers and their engagement within these realms. Abyss 607 is self taught and started painting and drawing the glyph in- spired Seers within the streets of Can- berra from 2009 and has since spent the last two years residing in and inspiring. Who: Abyss 607 What: Guardians

Through The Lens – A Look Back On 2015

Here are 65 images I think sum up 2015 pretty well, having said that I’m really looking forward to what 2016 has install so see you guys soon.

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Sunshines Top 10 – December 2015

It’s been a fairly cruisey year for us here at Invurt, with me up in Singapore a lot and general life-things-busy, it’s great to end the year in a high note, and what better way than with a bunch if photos from Dean Sunshine of all the grand shit he has seen over December? Check them all out below, and have a great Xmas and New Years – and stay tuned, we have some big things and exciting projects in store for 2016 when we’ll be ramping up thing here on the site again! 1. Adnate + Kaffeine – StKilda

Interview – E.L.K. – Not With It

 

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I can pinpoint where I met E.L.K. to the exact moment, and I can remember quite clearly, exactly, what was said and what happened. In fact, I wrote about it, so even if my memory had of, by chance, been a little hazy its all there.

It was, truth be told, something of a “moment” for me. On the one hand, that moment was the beginning of an entirely unexpected friendship with a man whose friendship I both respect and treasure, and on the other it was one of those moments that a writer looks back on and goes “I was there!” with some amount of pride (intermingled with a slight fraction of awe) – because, sitting here a year and a half later, at that time I had very little idea of where E.L.K. would be with today.

Neither, of course, did he.

Some of his words to me, back in the park where we first met, echoed in my mind as we sat down at The Vic last week, drinks in hand.

“If you can make a living, successfully,” doing what you love doing and doing what you’re good at,” he remarked “ … it’s the dream!”

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In the past year and a half, a part of this dream has, in truth, come true for E.L.K. His love for art, his passion and dedication over the years have paid off in many ways, and he now spends his “working hours” creating his art – but even being granted a partial aspect of his artistic dream hasn’t come without its own trials.

“I thought it would take a lot longer to get where I am,” he remarks, humbly as always, when I catch up with him. “I thought, ten years maybe, realistically. But it really has been a big couple of years.”

“I do feel tired,” he laughs. “Not I need a nap tired – I’m fucking drained!”

The fact that he can laugh about it all, however, marks that he has also taken it in his stride – because it really has been a big fucking year for E.L.K.

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After moving to Melbourne from Canberra, it seemed as if it was all systems go right from the very start. Although now residing in Richmond at Paradise Hills, E.L.K. did a short stint at Blender studios, where he immediately got to work on a new portrait piece of the much loved and notable Fr Bob Maguire.

When he first submitted Fr Bobs portrait to the Archibald prize, E.L.K. was less than certain as to how it would be received, this was, after all, one of the biggest contemporary art prizes in Australia. That it was selected to take part in the actual competition itself was not only a major win for street derived art in general, but it was a phenomenal boost for the career of an artist who had literally worked his ass off – it was another win for the acknowledgement that street derived art has a place in Australian contemporary art, and E.L.K. was at the forefront of it all.

“Its been a really big wave – a huge wave,” he explains when we start talking about his reflects on the Archibald “experience”.

“Not so much the Archibald itself, but the buzz surrounding it, the media surrounding it. Nothing prepares you for it. It’s what we all want – but when it actually happens, fuck, you can’t go back from it. Actually ‘making it’ can be pretty scary – but once you face it … well, not so much. ”

Beyond the media, the promotion and the entire “mainstream” rigmarole behind the Archibald, being a part of the whole process and event also gave E.L.K. something that he believed he was missing, something worth more in his mind than all the rest.

“It gave me more confidence,” he confided. “Which really was something I was lacking, within myself and with my art.” He sits back and takes a drink before putting on a wry grin, “Yeah, it was definitely an awesome ride.

“I felt like I was almost tapping into the zeitgeist,” he continued, talking about the entire experience. “The subject, the timing an the award, and it was just the right time. I think the Art Gallery of NSW was looking to introduce street art into the award, but they just hadn’t quite had the right piece. So, the planets aligned and it just … I felt like there was something a lot more spiritual going on behind the scenes, which is funny, coming from an atheist, but there was more to it I felt.”

E.L.K.s Archibald piece none withstanding, as a hardcore atheist, there was more than one “spiritual connection” that came from the experience – the other being the formation of a friendship with his subject.

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“I’ve become quite close with Fr Bob,” he says, smiling. “He’s a great guy. I’m like a 33 year old, and he’s much older … but we’re quite the same – kindred souls. He just says it how it is, and that’s something I’ve always done, and said. I may not always be right, but that’s my perception. With Fr Bob there’s no bullshit, and I respect that. It’s just nice to come across. Particularly in regards to the art world, you come across a lot of bullshit, so it’s nice to have a bit of truth.”

“We do talk quite regularly. I had a call from him last week and he said ‘what’s this about my face popping up all over town” he laughs, obviously making mention of the many Fr Bob stickers that have surreptitiously been springing up around Melbourne of late “… I kinda said, well, I can have a chat to them if you want, and I can see if they’ll stop doing it!”

Not only did E.L.K. form a bond with Fr Bob over the work, but it also lead him in a new direction with his work. Whereby previously, his work focused heavily on the portrayal of issues and other societal concerns, he found himself recently changing direction towards a more classically orientated bent – portraiture.

“I’ve actually concentrated a lot more on portraiture and less on the street sort of social commentary work that I’ve done,” he explained. “I think id like to establish myself more as a portrait artist than a stencil artist, to be honest.”

“The whole process of selecting a subject, meeting the subject and making the art and capturing that subject is great. Also, for me, and mainly, just the whole unveiling of the piece to the subject can be really touching.”

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As a man who has for time now been acknowledged as a master of his chosen technique, with stencils comprising up to seventy different layers of high degrees of detail, as well as an individual who has tackled subjects including war, religion, consumption and greed, it is this human touch to his new works in portraiture that have him flowing with exuberance.

“I don’t know what it is about it – its all, imagery creation,” he says, laconically, “but it really has nothing to do with technique anymore. It’s all about subject and content. I have the technique down pat – but getting the right image, and making it all work, that’s the hard part.”

Thus, his upcoming solo show at Metro Gallery, “Not With It”, is something of an explorative body of work for E.L.K.. Of course, within the show are several of his older themed pieces of social commentary, older themed work, but the body of the show, and the epic mainstay for a certainty, is in the portraiture that he will be displaying. Having been through a portion of the maelstrom of “success” and not gone down with the ship in the process, it seems that this has had nothing but a positive effect.

“It was really about pushing myself, in many ways,” he explains, “and to not worry about it too much. Just man-ing up and getting into it – which is what I did – but it wasn’t easy.”

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In fact, when we caught up at Paradise Hills that night, before our sojourn down to the pub on Victoria Street, E.L.K. had only just finished a portrait of aboriginal actor Jack Charles. The work is massive, one of the largest and most intricate pieces that I have ever seen him produce. The shades and tones of the work left me breathless, and as he pulls up a photo of it I can’t help but think that for all the “success” that he has had thus far, that this is only the beginning.

“It took me three weeks to do that piece,” he says, almost belying the effort behind it. “It was all about pushing things further … I can’t do what I used to do. I can’t sit down and cut for a hundred hours … it’s really good, but I’m tired.”

“It’s a really good kind of tired, though.”

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